This post is a little bit scary, but there’s truth in the numbers. Falls are one of OSHA’s Fatal Four for the most common workplace injuries. It’s definitely a serious problem. And the numbers get even worse when accidents at home are added.

Ladder Safety Statistics

Here’s some perspective on fall related injuries and deaths.

  1. Every year, hospitals and other treatment facilities record treating more than 500,000 people from falling off ladders. [1]
  2. Approximately 300 people die because of ladders annually. [2]
  3. 43% of the deadly falls during the last decade are related to ladders. [3]
  4. The yearly cost for fixing damages caused by ladder injuries can reach up to $24 billion. This includes medical and legal fees as well as the money lost during work absence. [1]
  5. In 2011, a report on the occupational ladder fall injuries in the US states that there were 113 deaths, 15,460 nonfatal injuries that happened away from work and 34,000 nonfatal injuries that were addressed by emergency departments. [3]
  6. A hit on the head is almost always fatal. 49% of the people who died from falling off ladders had head injuries. [3]
  7. 32% of people with the nonfatal injuries had damage to their lower extremities. But only 5% of them had head injuries. [3]
  8. 27% of injuries and illnesses reported by employers to a 16 year ongoing study that ended in 2015 where related to falls, slips and trips. That’s a total of more than 300,000 cases. [4]
  9. Almost 40% of work-related falls that resulted in death involved roofs and ladders. 20% of the falls resulted from ladders while 18% dealt with roofs. [4]
  10. In 2011, 35% of the fatal falls were from 15 feet or even less. Meaning, you don’t have to be situated in a very high place to get injured from a fall. [5]
  11. So most fall related injuries and deaths that concerned ladders are not caused by the sheer height of the fall. Instead, they’re mostly caused by the misuse of the ladders. [6]

How to be safe around ladders

Our installation crews are trained regularly as a reminder on the importance of ladder safety. They use the most appropriate equipment to accomplish a task at hand. So they not only get the job done, but they do it safely to return home to their families.  

We share this as a reminder on how precious health is. And if we can offer assistance to complete a task or just prevent a task that could put you or a loved one in harm’s way, it’s absolutely worth considering.  Please contact us before taking a risk.  

 

LeafGuard of Lake Erie serves multiple counties in both Pennsylvania and New York. If you live in Erie, Crawford, Venango, Warren or Mercer Counties in PA; or Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Niagara, or Erie Counties in New York, then we are your trusted source for LeafGuard Gutter Systems. We can help with all types of gutters and related components like soffit, fascia and siding trim.  Contact us for help with your issue.

 

Sources:
[1] US Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2014. Unpublished data from the National Injury Information Clearinghouse (CPSC) using the CPSC’s Injury Cost Model.
[2] National Center for Health Statistics, 2017. Multiple Cause of Death 1999-2015 on CDC WONDER Online Database. http://wonder.cdc.gov/mcd-icd10.html.
[3] National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014. Occupational Ladder Fall Injuries — United States, 2011. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6316a2.htm
[4] U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U. S. Department of Labor, 2010. Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses. https://www.bls.gov/opub/hom/soii/home.htm
[5] U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, 2013. Occupation Injury and Illness Classification System (OIICS), 2011. https://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfch0010.pdf
[6] https://www.retailassociationservices.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/At-what-height-do-most-ladder-injuries-occur.pdf